IRS Scams to Watch Out For

Every year, mostly during tax season, IRS scams fool people into giving away their money and identities. We don’t want that to happen to you!

This is what you need to know about IRS scams.

Irs Scams

1.You receive an e-mail claiming to be from the IRS

IRS scams are commonly sent via e-mail. Know that you will NEVER receive an e-mail from the IRS. Do not open any attachments. Do not click on any links. Do not reply. Forward the e-mail to phishing@irs.gov and then delete the original e-mail.

2.You receive a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS.

Know this:

  • While, the IRS may call you (this is rare), their first form of communication is via snail mail. So, if there was a problem with the IRS, you would probably already have a letter (or a handful of letters) with the same information as what you are being given over the phone.
  • If the caller is actually from the IRS they will have no problem providing you with their name, badge number and callback number. You should call 1-800-366-4484 to find out if the caller is an IRS employee with a legitimate reason for contacting you. If their information can be verified, call them back.
  • If the person is not an IRS employee,  this is an IRS scam and you can report it to phishing@irs.gov.
  • The IRS will never demand payment over the phone in the form of your credit or debit card number, specific payment method, like a prepaid gift card or debit card, wire transfer.
  • The IRS will never threaten to immediately have you arrested for not paying.
  • The IRS will never demand payment without giving you the opportunity to appeal.

3. Paper Notices

This is a new tactic, where IRS scam artists are sending out actual snail mail in an effort to get you to send them payment. Yes, the IRS will send you mail, but if anything ever seems suspicious ask your accountant or verify it with the IRS before making any payment or handing over your personal information.

What to look out for :

  • Mail that appears to be issued from an Austin, TX address.
  • Mail regarding the Affordable Care Act – requesting information regarding 2014 coverage.
  • Mail that lists letter number 105C on the payment voucher.
  • Requests checks to be made out to I.R.S. and sent to the “Austin Processing Center” at a PO Box.

What you can do:

  • The IRS home page has a search function. Search the form number or notice number. If you can’t find any information, call 1-800-829-1040 to determine if it is legitimate.
  • If it is not, please send a report to phishing@irs.gov

Have we mentioned phishing@irs.gov enough?

It is important to report e-mails, calls and notices that could be potential scams. The more we report IRS scams, the more scammers can be stopped from robbing anyone else of their money or identity.

Where did we get our information?

Check out this handy chart at IRS.gov

Stay Safe Everyone!

IRS scams

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